Tuesday, July 27, 2010

Black Stems

I don't use too many tropical plants in the garden, but every once in a while I lose focus while at the nursery and end up bringing home something that is way out of the plan. That is what happened with this taro (colocasia esculenta) plant. But I must say I am intrigued with these beautiful black stems and the contrast they add to the garden.
Taro is used in many regions of the world as a food, the root being the edible portion. I have grown it around my pond in Laguna and it loves the water and actually moved right into the waterfall causing all kinds of problems. It is also called elephant ears for obvious reasons. I know it is out of place in this bed with the scabiosa and roses, but it has my attention for now.

5 comments:

Northern Shade said...

I grow this in a container on my patio, and love the tropical look of the large leaves. There are double tuberous begonia and lobelia in the pot with them. They won't last long when the frost comes, but provide wonderfully exotic leaves until then. They sure grew well when we had lots of rain. I think mine yearn for your waterfall.

Anonymous said...

I would love to be as you are, at one with plants and nature - my Mother was a person that knew the name of every tree, plant and flower - it is such a unique gift to some but sadly not to all.

Barbara said...

I love this plant! I actually bought one, but returned as I was afraid my garden was too dry for it.

Perhaps I need to build a pond and waterfall. I'll put that right on the to do list — the very long to do list.

James Missier said...

It look very mysterious - to have a black stemed plant. Though these alocasias are so common in my region, I have yet to come across a black one.
You can also place it in a unholed pot as the water may just sit with the soil. or get a bigger pot or something and place this one right inside there.
You can also divide those offsprings as they multiply.

Zoey said...

I love your Elephant Ears. In fact I think I just bought the same one! The black stems are what won me over, too. I have it next to an arbor with some green EE's and some cannas.

I love to mix tropicals with my regular perennials in my Michigan garden.