Tuesday, September 7, 2010

Hosta La Vista...

I would like to think that I am a conscientious gardener, taking into consideration the adaptability and appropriateness of the plants I choose to use in my gardens. For the most part I am, but I also have a romantic side that explains why I would buy and plant a hosta when I know darn well that it will never survive in our climate. Those showy foliage darlings of east coast shade gardens that we gardeners on the west coast covet so, show up in the nurseries every spring even though they are pretty much an expensive annual here. The one in the picture above has been there for a couple years, slowly getting smaller and smaller until it will disappear all together I suspect. Best to enjoy it while it lasts and look for a more appropriate replacement soon.

4 comments:

Robur d'Amour said...

What's the big deal about being conscientious. Don't feel guilty about growing whatever takes your fancy.

In England, it's often rainy, and hostas like those conditions. And slugs especially love them. Wet weather brings the slugs out for a feast.

Human nature, being as contrary as it is, I try to grow some tropical stuff, which is challenging here.

gardenwalkgardentalk.com said...

I had no idea Hostas were mainly in my area and did not live countrywide. Here you almost can't kill them. It is not that the weather is rainy and cool. This year,dry and 90 and no hosta problems.

GoneferalinID said...

I've fallen prey to the hosta draw. I'm from the Midwest originally, and even as a kid, I appreciated their beauty. They sell "sun tolerant" varieties here in Boise, and I think it is pure torture for the poor plants. Mine from last summer came back up and looked great during the cool, wet spring. They are back to straw like skeletons again. I should put them out of their misery and pull the poor buggers out.

Bloomin Designs said...

The good news is that you may have some help. While we have often cautioned about the perils of growing hostas in zones to warm to allow sufficient dormancy, there are some trials being held in Orlando to determine which hostas may be the hardiest. The 5-year trial results are anticipated to be released in 2 more years by the Hosta Growers Association.